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Shakespeare's Globe Theatre by Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Shakespeare's Globe Theatre by Ja-Kitsu-Ryou
This is part of the many notes and drawings I had of the Globe Theatre, of which I had wanted to construct a 3-d model. I decided that it was a project far too large to handle... :)
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:iconandichan04:
Andichan04 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2010  Professional General Artist
oh, this is so great! :love:
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:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you! :D
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:iconeilonwysedai:
EilonwySedai Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2010
This is excellent. I'd like to invite you to join :icontheatreartists: and submit this.
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:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you! I would love to join, though I'm afraid it'll be a while before I draw anything else theatre-related. :)
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:iconeilonwysedai:
EilonwySedai Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2010
No problem! We're very low key. You don't have to contribute steadily to be a member. :wave:
You can submit just that one if you want.
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:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you :D
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:iconmoliken:
moliken Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2009
ja, any chance you want to allow an educational publishing company in delaware to use your fantastic Globe Theater print in some of their publications. we sell books and supplementary materials to high schools around the country,and the drawing is just what we need. we would of course pay for permission and list you as the artist. contact me
paul at prestwickhouse dot com
sorry about the double posting
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:iconxxacidaxx:
xXACIDAXx Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
Good work! :)
I use it to study elizabethan Theatre!!!
thank u! XD
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:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you :D
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:iconxxacidaxx:
xXACIDAXx Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2009
eheh...
excuse me... can you help me to write a small descripton of theatre????
thx :)
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:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I would be happy to. :) Do you mean like describing the theatre, and is there anything specific you would like?
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:iconxxacidaxx:
xXACIDAXx Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2009
Can you help me to correct this composition?
()= variant,another version

TEATRO ELISABETTIANO

The frist elisabethan theatre was built in 5th century (were built in London towards the end of the 16th century).
The thatre was made by wood.
Some thatres were destroyed by fire because they were made by wood. In elisabethan theatre was no elettricity so they used natural light, infact they made performance only in the morning.(didnt use artificil lights...). The performance Some example of elizabethan theatre: the Globe, the Swan, the Theatre and the Rose. The Globe was the most important theatre of London and it could hold up to 3000 spectators.
We know the Globe and other Elizabethan theaters from drawings and construction contracts.
The elisabethan theatre had a circular or octagonal form.
There was three lines of galleries (one above the other, looking down on stage) covered by thatched roof.(where the audiences paid more to sit on these wooden benches under a roof to keep out the sun and rain.
In center the theatre was opened one above the other, looking down on stage.
Behind the large apron stage, which jutted out into the yard, was a balcony-like stage.
Below this was an inner stage hidden by a curtain, used for indoor and intimate scenes.
• Apron Stage was a stage that projects into the auditorium so that the audience sit on three sides of it .
• The Apron Stage is a stage in the theater on which actors can perform.
• Apron Stage was the part of the stage in the theatre which is in front of the curtain.
.... and covered by a canopy (roof).
Elizabethans referred to the canopy (roof) as "Heaven" because it was painted as heaven.
There was an open place where the "groundlings" could stand for a penny (paid one penny to stand here).
The actor playing ghosts or monster could rise or discend through the trap-door built into the apron stage. The trap door represented the Hell.
Behind the apron stage there was three doors where the actors rested when the scene changed.
At the top ther was a flag that signified was type of represtation was being performed: black for the tragedy, withe for the commedy and red for history.
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:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
How is this? It is a bit lengthy, but feel free to edit or change anything I've written here, whatever suits your needs. Thank you for giving me this opportunity, it was really fun. :D

The Elizabethan theatre was a popular form of entertainment in 16th century England, and towards the end of the century four of the most famous theatres were built in London: the Globe, the Swan, the Rose, and the Theatre. The Globe was the largest and most important theatre in London, and it could hold up to 3000 spectators. Records such as construction blueprints and artist’s illustrations of the period give enough details that a theatre can be reconstructed exactly like the buildings in the past.

Theatres were often made out of wood, much like houses are today, and they were built like an octagonal or circular shape. Theatres are built to have three floors, or galleries, along the inner edge of the theatre while the center stands open. In the earlier days, the galleries had thatched roofs, but after several theatres were destroyed from fires the thatch was replaced by tile. Since the galleries were protected from the elements and provided a better view as well as seating, spectators had to pay more than the “groundlings” that stood on the brick-covered ground level. The people that stood in the uncovered center area of the theatre only needed to pay one penny, and the cost would go up for each level. For example, the cost to sit in the bottommost gallery would be two pennies, the second level would be three pennies, etc…

The greatest spectacle in the theatre was, of course, the stage. There are many different parts in an Elizabethan theatre. The first level is a solid platform that is about ten feet high from the ground, and this spreads out into the middle of the audience with two wings on the sides so that it is like a very large and think letter “T.” This way the audience can see the actors from virtually all sides. Near the back of the main stage was an area that could be hidden by curtains, and was usually used for indoor or special scenes while the main stage was used for outdoor scenes with lots of action. Behind this curtained area were three doors where the actors could rest when the scene changed. Near the center of the stage there was a trapdoor known as doorway to “Hell,” and special effects such as the appearance of Death or other sinister characters often took advantage of this trapdoor.

Above the stage was a balcony, behind which was another area that could be curtained off. The balcony was also used for special effects, and the bottom of it was painted with an image of the sky, sometimes with various constellations or astrological figures. Heavenly characters such as angels or deities could be lowered down from “Heaven” to the stage below with ropes and pulleys, a common event in a performance such as a Greek historical play.

At the top of the theatre, above the third level that held the musicians and creators of sound effects, was the pole that flew the flag. This flag was a signal to everyone in the city that a play was going to be presented. Each type of play had a different flag: black for tragedy, white for comedy, and red for history. People could see the flag flying at the top of the theatre, and look forward to the spectacle that was to come.
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:iconxxacidaxx:
xXACIDAXx Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009
U___________U



greatful!!!!!!!!!



thank a lot!!!!!!!!!
:love: :love: :love: :love: :love: :love: :love: :love: :love: :love:
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:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
A pleasure :D I really enjoyed it!
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:iconrozebud2:
rozebud2 Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2008
Hi - LOVE this drawing of the Globe Theatre! I'm writing to you from the Shakespeare Festival of St. Louis to ask your permission to use it in a Study Guide. We provide study guides to all schools who book our Education Tour, and will also offer them free for download online at our new website scheduled to launch by the end of the week at [link]. (Please ignore the crappy old website; the sooner that disgrace goes away the happier I will be! The new one is lovely.)

Please email me at rwolownik at sfstl dot com and let me know if we can use this work with your permission, and, if so, how you would like to be credited. Thanks so much!

Roze
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:iconmoliken:
moliken Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2009
ja, any chance you want to allow an educational publishing company in delaware to use your fantastic Globe Theater print in some of their publications. we sell books and supplementary materials to high schools around the country,and the drawing is just what we need. we would of course pay for permission and list you as the artist. contact me
paul at prestwickhouse dot com
Reply
:iconja-kitsu-ryou:
Ja-Kitsu-Ryou Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you so much! :love: I hope you got the email I sent you.
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